The Jazz Crusade Audio Sampler Catalog
JCCD-3001: Kid Thomas & his Algiers Stompers - 'Same Old Soupbone'

Personnel: Kid Thomas (tp), Louis Nelson (tb), Manny Paul (tsx), Charlie Hamilton (pn), Joseph "Twat" Butler (sbs), Sammy Penn (dm)

Songs: The Sheik of Araby, St. Louis Blues, Bill Bailey, Blueberry Hill, Girl of My Dreams, That's A Plenty, Tin Roof Blues, Muscat Ramble, Over the Waves, Oh Lady be Good, Just A Closer Walk with Thee, Ciribiribin, Say Si Si, Boogie Woogie.

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Reviews for:
JCCD-3001: Kid Thomas & his Algiers Stompers - 'Same Old Soupbone'

Doctor Jazz - Holland

Imagine: Kid Thomas Valentine stays (during a tour) with a member of the committee of the Connecticut Traditional Jazz Club (Pete Campbell). Campbell succeeds in getting the interest of a TV station to record at his place, in the garden on a terrace. That was in 1968. Years later Big Bill Bissonnette, the owner of the Jazz Crusade label, finds out that the TV has erased the video tape with the remark, "of no historical interest" (don't we know in Holland the same stories?). It was great luck that a lover of the music kept a soundtrack tape and it is that sound that we find for the first time on this CD. A historical garden-concert I like to call it.
Characteristic Kid Thomas Valentine; Louis Nelson as relaxed as possible (listen to Tin Roof Blues); Emmanuel Paul with his fine tone (listen to Sheik of Ara-by); the light dancing sound of the group (Muscat - not muskrat here - Ramble); the whole atmosphere that gives you the feeling that the musicians are playing happily. The light touch of it all tells you again that New Orleans Jazz isn't always heavy and massive. The Algiers Stompers prove it. Almost an hour full of pur jazz; I realize with a repertoire that has been played over and over but it is a part of history too, this time recorded in a garden and that is at least very special!
- Wim Van Eyle


Kings Jazz Review - British Magazine

The session on this CD was recorded in connection with a television programme whilst the Kid Thomas band was on tour in Connecticut, and the result is a fine example of old-style New Orleans music.
Tom Valentine, then aged 72, had lost little of his power and his clusters of notes punctuate each number as he leads the band in his own familiar dynamic style.
Complementing Tom in the front line, Louis Nelson on trombone deceptively smooth at times and then, suddenly, scorches along in a hot solo, whilst the warm, rich sounds of Manny Paul's tenor sax inter-weave in a completely laid-back way. The rhythm section provides a perfect backing with the sophisticated piano playing of Charlie Hamilton contrasting with the precise, rock-steady drive of Joe Butler's bass and some percussive fireworks from Sammy ^Penn. Add this CD to your collection.
- John Rickard


New Orleans Music - British Magazine

I don't need to tell you that this was a marvelous band. Tom was in great shape and leads the band in his own inimitable way. He was a REAL leader. His powerful trumpet rings out loud and clear and the rhythmic jabs add a lot to the dynamics of the band. Nelson was the perfect trombone player for this band, suave and sweet at one moment and then matching the power of Tom's trumpet in the hot choruses. For me one of the most glorious sounds in New Orleans music was Manny Paul's tenor sax. The sound he got out of his tenor was completely unique, his relaxed swing a thing to marvel at. If Joe James was the perfect pianist for the Algiers Stompers, Charlie Hamilton was a very good replacement, although his style was completely different and much more sophisticated. Listen to the beautiful chimes he plays on Tin Roof Blues. Joe Butler was Tom's regular bass player for many years and he laid down a rock-steady rhythmic foundation for the band. What can I say about Sammy Penn? If there ever was a complete New Orleans drummer it was Sammy Penn. This CD is an absolute must and hopefully will be the first in a long line of new Jazz Crusades. Get it!
- Mike Hazledine


AMG **** Review - U. S. Jazz Guide

When he recorded this album, Kid Thomas Valentine had been playing New Orleans traditional jazz for almost 60 years, having started playing when he was just ten. This was by no means unusual for young, African-American children in New Orleans during the early part of the 20th century, when jazz was born and nurtured. And, like many of his contemporaries, he did not find himself in a recording studio until relatively late in his professional life. In Thomas' case, he recorded first in 1951. Being a very good lead trumpeter, he tended to lay out the melody sparsely and then let his band players pick it up from there. Thomas was also known for the use of various types of mutes: plunger, derby, and others. That's the case with this session recorded in the Connecticut home of Pete Campbell while the Thomas contingent was touring that State. The play list on this CD goes a little beyond that of the typical traditional jazz repertoire. There's such tunes as "Oh! Lady Be Good" and "Ciribiribin," but these are played with that special tempo and syncopation which sets New Orleans playing apart. One of the album's most appealing tracks is a song that was especially favored by traditional players, "Just a Closer Walk." Kicked off by another veteran who was there at the beginning, trombonist Louis Nelson, every member of the group gets an opportunity to state the melody as they see it. Then the ensemble takes over in a style recalling the music that accompanies a recently departed friend during the trek to the grave site. Another feature of this album is that there is no clarinet. Rather, Manny Paul is heard on New Orleans-style tenor sax, giving the music a fuller sound. He is particularly effective in "Tin Roof Blues." This is an excellent, entertaining document about the way the jazz was played in the Crescent City during the early years, and is highly recommended.
- Dave Nathan


Jazz Journal International - British Jazz Magazine

Recorded out of doors as the sound-track for a television broadcast (which has long since been destroyed) organised by the Connecticut Traditional Jazz Club, this presents the band in typical form, though lacking some physical impact because of the ambience in which they were playing. The recording itself is / clean and clear, if a little dry, but the balance makes Thomas and Nelson sound distant and, since they were the driving force of the band, the whole thing lacks something by comparison with other recordings by these same musicians. It sounds as though they were both on good form, however, and so were the rhythm section, with Manny Paul taking advantage of a favourable balance to make an even better impression than usual. There are plenty of other records by this band, however, so this will probably only be of interest to particular enthusiasts.
- Christopher Hillman


All Music Guide—Internet Jazz Publication

When he recorded this album, Kid Thomas Valentine had been playing New Orleans traditional jazz for almost 60 years, having started playing when he was just ten. This was by no means unusual for young, African-American children in New Orleans during the early part of the 20th century, when jazz was born and nurtured. And, like many of his contemporaries, he did not find himself in a recording studio until relatively late in his professional life. In Thomas' case, he recorded first in 1951. Being a very good lead trumpeter, he tended to lay out the melody sparsely and then let his band players pick it up from there. Thomas was also known for the use of various types of mutes: plunger, derby, and others. That's the case with this session recorded in the Connecticut home of Pete Campbell while the Thomas contingent was touring that State. The play list on this CD goes a little beyond that of the typical traditional jazz repertoire. There's such tunes as "Oh! Lady Be Good" and "Ciribiribin," but these are played with that special tempo and syncopation which sets New Orleans playing apart. One of the album's most appealing tracks is a song that was especially favored by traditional players, "Just a Closer Walk." Kicked off by another veteran who was there at the beginning, trombonist Louis Nelson, every member of the group gets an opportunity to state the melody as they see it. Then the ensemble takes over in a style recalling the music that accompanies a recently departed friend during the trek to the grave site. Another feature of this album is that there is no clarinet. Rather, Manny Paul is heard on New Orleans-style tenor sax, giving the music a fuller sound. He is particularly effective in "Tin Roof Blues." This is an excellent, entertaining document about the way the jazz was played in the Crescent City during the early years, and is highly recommended.
- Dave Nathan


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